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Bio Tech Emergency Services

Welcome to Bio Tec Emergency Services!

Bio Tec Emergency Services is a nationwide clean up and responder company that helps bring aid to families when they need it most. We specialize in crime scene clean up, water damage restoration, biohazard clean up, mold cleanup, trauma clean up, and hoarding clean up that families and customers have come to rely on. Proudly serving Minneapolis, St. Paul, Chicago, Duluth, Madison, Philadelphia, Rochester, Olympia, Omaha, Riverside, Denver, Milwaukee, Seattle, Tacoma, the Twin Cities and surrounding areas nationwide. With 24 hour emergency responders available around the clock, you can feel safe knowing that we are just one call away from any situation.

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Contact Bio Tec Emergency Services for Biohazard Clean Up, Blood Clean Up, Crime Scene Clean Up, Crime Scene Cleaner, Crime Scene Cleaners, Crime Scene Cleaning, Death Cleanup, Fire Restoration, Flood Damage, Flood Restoration, Hoarding Clean Up, Mold Cleanup, Suicide Clean Up, Trauma Clean Up, and Water Damage. Proudly supporting the areas of Chicago, Denver, Duluth, Madison, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Olympia, Omaha, Philadelphia, Riverside, Rochester, Seattle, St. Paul, Tacoma, Twin Cities, and surrounding areas.

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Contact Bio Tec Emergency Services for Biohazard Clean Up in Omaha, Blood Clean Up in Omaha, Crime Scene Clean Up in Omaha, Crime Scene Cleaner in Omaha, Crime Scene Cleaners in Omaha, Crime Scene Cleaning in Omaha, Death Cleanup in Omaha, Fire Restoration in Omaha, Flood Damage in Omaha, Flood Restoration in Omaha, Hoarding Clean Up in Omaha, Mold Cleanup in Omaha, Suicide Clean Up in Omaha, Trauma Clean Up in Omaha, Water Damage in Omaha, and in surrounding areas.

Below is some general information about Omaha:

Omaha is the largest city in the state of Nebraska, United States, and is the county seat of Douglas County. It is located in the Midwestern United States on the Missouri River, about 10 miles (16 km) north of the mouth of the Platte River. Omaha is the anchor of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area, which includes Council Bluffs, Iowa, across the Missouri River from Omaha. According to the 2010 Census, Omaha’s population was 408,958, making it the nation’s 42nd-largest city. According to the 2012 Population Estimates, Omaha’s population was 421,570. Including its suburbs, Omaha formed the 60th-largest metropolitan area in the United States in 2010, with an estimated population of 877,110 residing in eight counties. There are more than 1.2 million residents within a 50-mile (80-km) radius of the city’s center, forming the Greater Omaha area.

Today, Omaha is the home to the headquarters of five Fortune 500 companies: packaged-food giant ConAgra Foods; the U.S.’s largest railroad operator, Union Pacific Corporation; insurance and financial firm Mutual of Omaha; one of the world’s largest construction companies, Kiewit Corporation; and mega-conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway. Berkshire Hathaway is headed by local investor Warren Buffett, one of the richest people in the world, according to a decade’s worth of Forbes Magazine rankings, some of which have ranked him as high as No. 1. Omaha is also the home to four Fortune 1000 headquarters: TD Ameritrade, West Corporation, Valmont Industries, and Werner Enterprises. First National Bank of Omaha is the largest privately held bank in the United States. Headquarters for Leo A Daly, HDR, Inc. and DLR Group, three of the US’s largest 10 architecture/engineering firms, are based in Omaha. The Gallup Organization, of Gallup Poll fame, also is based in Omaha, with its riverfront Gallup University. Enron began in Omaha as Northern Natural Gas in 1930 before taking over a smaller Houston company in 1985 to form InterNorth, which was moved permanently to Houston in 1987 by the notorious Kenneth Lay.

The modern economy of Omaha is diverse and built on skilled knowledge jobs. In 2009, Forbes identified Omaha as the nation’s number one Best Bang-For-The Buck City and number one on America’s Fastest-Recovering Cities list. Tourism in Omaha benefits the city’s economy greatly, with the annual College World Series providing important revenue and the city’s Henry Doorly Zoo serving as the top attraction in Nebraska. Omaha hosted the Olympic swim trials in 2008 and in 2012. Notable modern Omaha inventions include the TV dinner, developed by Omaha’s then-Carl Swanson Co.; Raisin Bran, developed by Omaha’s Skinner Macaroni Co.; cake mix, developed by Duncan Hines, then a division of Omaha’s Nebraska Consolidated Mills, the forerunner to today’s ConAgra Foods; Butter Brickel Ice Cream and the Reuben sandwich, conceived by a chef at the then-Blackstone Hotel on 33rd and Farnam Streets; center-pivot irrigation by Omaha’s now-Valmont Corporation; the bobby pin and the pink hair curler, at Omaha’s Tip Top; the ski lift, in 1936, by Omaha’s Union Pacific Corp; the Top 40 radio format, pioneered by Todd Storz, scion of Omaha’s Storz Brewing Co., and head of Storz Broadcasting, which was the first in the U.S. to use the Top 40 format at Omaha’s KOWH Radio. A character in a Rudyard Kipling essay claimed dice were invented in Omaha, and the man who invented ’em, he made a colossal fortune.

Since its founding, ethnic groups in the city have clustered in enclaves in north, south and downtown Omaha. In its early days, the sometimes lawless nature of a new frontier city included crime, such as illicit gambling and riots. Today, the diverse culture of Omaha includes a variety of performance venues, museums, and musical heritage, including the historically significant jazz scene in North Omaha and the modern and influential Omaha Sound. Sports have been important in Omaha for more than a century, and the city currently plays host to three minor-league professional sports teams. It is perhaps more known as the home of the College World Series, to which it has played host since 1950. The Kings, an NBA franchise, called Omaha and Kansas City home from 1972 to 1978. The Kansas City-Omaha Kings split their time between the two cities, playing at Kansas City’s Municipal Auditorium and the Omaha Civic Auditorium, before decamping solely to Kansas City until 1985, when the team moved to its current home of Sacramento.

Omaha is home to dozens of nationally, regionally and locally significant landmarks. The city has more than a dozen historic districts, including Fort Omaha Historic District, Gold Coast Historic District, Omaha Quartermaster Depot Historic District, Field Club Historic District, Bemis Park Historic District, and the South Omaha Main Street Historic District. Omaha is notorious for its 1989 demolition of 24 buildings in the Jobbers Canyon Historic District, which represents to date the largest loss of buildings on the National Register. The only original building surviving of that complex is the Nash Block. Omaha has almost one hundred individual properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including the Bank of Florence, Holy Family Church, the Christian Specht Building and the Joslyn Castle. There are also three properties designated as National Historic Landmarks.

Source: Omaha on Wikipedia